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Who replaces entertainment funding? Streamers have part of the answer

Back in November, I wrote an FTN piece about the fight of students such as Frédéric Jollien, against the mandatory media royalties in Switzerland. They campaigned for the abolishing of a yearly tax of 450 CHF (€385/$453), used to finance public TV and radio stations. One of the most vile criticisms howled at them was that such a move would get rid of these public broadcasters and their cultural enrichment.

We should actually worship Mark Zuckerberg

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg recently appeared in a hearing in the European Parliament. EU legislators wanted to re-create a similar situation than the hearing conducted in the U.S Congress. Once again, Zuckerberg found himself at a public trial, being used for the self-aggrandisement of politicians. Why does nobody appreciate the value created by Silicon Valley giants?

A thank you letter to Uber

When we think about people in the public eye we should thank, we think of figures such as Mother Teresa (we'll let Christopher Hitchens spin in his grave at this mention) or Princess Diana, who virtuously stood out because of their charity work. However, it is demonstrably true that the people who create the technology that betters our lives need an even bigger sense of gratitude.

We should consider increasing private policing

Last month, the Daily Mail newspaper in the United Kingdom published a viral story about a private police force which has proven to be very effective. The company, TM Eye, is lead by former Scotland Yard senior officers, and has a conviction rate of 100 per cent. The key: this police force has been taking on offences which state police officers are too busy to crack down on, including fraud, missing persons, theft or stalking, but also murder and rape.

Don’t give in to technopanic: the internet is awesome!

The amount of stories and commentary in mainstream news sources about how the internet ruins childhood, attention spans and social interactions, is immense. If you were to arrive in this day and age with a time-machine from the 1960s, you'd think that the internet was the first possible thing one could possibly use: giant corporations frantically praying on consumers which become the victim of the technological age.

 

Don't throw your smartphone away - use it more efficiently

Actors become politicians, so why not put MPs in musicals

In a recent opinion piece for everyone's favourite newspaper, The Guardian, Rhik Samadder, makes the case of getting rid of your smart phone. His goal: leaving the phone in a different room, and only replying to messages once a day.