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FREE PRIVATE CITIES – THERE IS AN ALTERNATIVE

Imagine a system in which a private company, as a government service provider, offers you the protection of life, liberty, and property. This service includes internal and external security, a legal and regulatory framework and independent dispute resolution. For these services, you pay a contractually fixed fee per year. The state service provider as operator of the community can not unilaterally change this "citizens contract" with you later. As a "contract citizen", you have a legal claim to compliance and a claim for damages in the event of failures.

Don’t give in to technopanic: the internet is awesome!

The amount of stories and commentary in mainstream news sources about how the internet ruins childhood, attention spans and social interactions, is immense. If you were to arrive in this day and age with a time-machine from the 1960s, you'd think that the internet was the first possible thing one could possibly use: giant corporations frantically praying on consumers which become the victim of the technological age.

 

Recycling CO2 might be possible in the future

While the question of CO2-emissions becomes increasingly worrying for most members of society, the answer from many government officials sounds dim. As of now, the reduction of pollution with the greenhouse gas is only dealt with through advocacy of lower consumption: we institute daylight saving times, No Car days or ban plastic bags. Whether or not we agree with these measures, they are undoubtedly inconvenient.

Singularities Explained

Mathematician Kelsey Houston-Edwards explains exactly what singularities are and how they exist right under our noses. Video by PBS on Youtube.

Metal on semiconductors may lead to invisibility cloaks

Researchers have developed a new technique that peppers metallic nanoparticles into semiconductors, an advance that could boost the efficiency of LED lighting by 50 percent and even pave the way for invisibility cloaking devices.

It’s the first technique that can inexpensively grow metal nanoparticles both on and below the surface of semiconductors.

The process adds virtually no cost during manufacturing and its improved efficiency could allow manufacturers to use fewer semiconductors in finished products, making them less expensive.

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