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Social justice warriors are going to hate this girl

Hebing Wang’s take on the social justice movement in academia
Hebin Wang

“They don’t like Asians”, says Hebing Wang with a smirk as she elaborates on the social justice movement and its underlying philosophy. “In a world in which everything is based on oppression points and not on merit, they cannot stand the fact that Asians are actually over-achievers.”

Hebing has a Chinese background, yet lived most of her life in the United States, where she studied. When she signed up for a gender studies class in her university, little did she know how much influence the professors have on their students. She points out that the ideas perpetrated and normalised in modern day American universities are third-wave feminism and intersectionality.

“They teach that race and gender are the sole crucial factors for how we interact in society, and that minorities are constantly victimised against. It took me half a semester to start questioning their dogma.” During a class in which the professor explained that the success of “whitening” beauty products in large parts of Asia was caused by euro-centrism, Hebing raised her voice and negated the teacher. “I told her that had nothing to do with Europe. Historically, those who were paler didn’t have to work in the fields, and therefore had a better class standing. It’s the sun, not colonialism…”. The response shocked her: “My professor said that while she recognises the validity in my opinion, she’d still believes it has to do with Euro-centrism.” This immense refusal to consider different opinions was what really threw her off. “These people are part of a cult. They are not willing to challenge their own beliefs.” In her opinion, too many college professors are preying on impressionable, often sheltered students who are freshly out of high school.

At the same time, unlike many of her progressive peers at the time, Hebing continued to have conservative friends in college. However, she would constantly be reminded by classmates that she shouldn’t hang out with them. “The narrative here is that they are all socially retarded dickheads who are bigoted against gay people and other minorities.”

It was around that time that she discovered Student For Liberty, for which she later became a Campus Coordinator. Although, it certainly wasn’t the conservatives that attracted her the most in terms of philosophy. “I think my progressive friends have a valid point in the sense that you should be a decent person, and be nice to others. I don’t care what gender you identify as today and I don’t mind using your preferred pronouns either. What I do not want is to infest higher education with an ideology that preaches state control to manage their imaginary reality. In the same way that I don’t like being called ‘chubby cheeks’, if someone did, my instinct wouldn’t be to punch them in the face. If someone offends me, I just don’t hang out with them anymore.”

The appeal in anarcho-capitalism is that it advocates a society of voluntary cooperation, and not allowing state control to run rampant. “The more you delve into the history of countries like China and the United States, the more difficult it is to sustain the idea of having a government as a force for good.”

Submitted by Bill Wirtz on 4 December 2017