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Free private cities can revolutionise the way we live together

“There are two sides to every issue: one side is right and the other is wrong, but the middle is always evil … In any compromise between food and poison, it is only death that can win. In any compromise between good and evil, it is only evil that can profit.” (Galt’s Speech)

✈️ Innovation in Aviation: Testing the Bombardier CS100

Flight experiences on short- and medium haul itineraries in Europe rarely differ much. By introducing the CS100 Canada's Bombardier aims to challenge the notion that the narrow body market became commoditized. We were skeptical if there's any room for actual inflight innovation in the field of narrow body jets and thus went on and reviewed this new plane comparing it with the most successful planes of all times.

Phone cameras have become little helpers in engaging with law enforcement

Remember when the first mobile phones came with integrated cameras? A revolutionary concept to many people, which begged many to ask the question why a camera was necessary in a mobile in the first place? Didn't we have proper cameras for that. And indeed, the first phone cameras didn't really prove to be very effective.

FREE PRIVATE CITIES – THERE IS AN ALTERNATIVE

Imagine a system in which a private company, as a government service provider, offers you the protection of life, liberty, and property. This service includes internal and external security, a legal and regulatory framework and independent dispute resolution. For these services, you pay a contractually fixed fee per year. The state service provider as operator of the community can not unilaterally change this "citizens contract" with you later. As a "contract citizen", you have a legal claim to compliance and a claim for damages in the event of failures.

Who replaces entertainment funding? Streamers have part of the answer

Back in November, I wrote an FTN piece about the fight of students such as Frédéric Jollien, against the mandatory media royalties in Switzerland. They campaigned for the abolishing of a yearly tax of 450 CHF (€385/$453), used to finance public TV and radio stations. One of the most vile criticisms howled at them was that such a move would get rid of these public broadcasters and their cultural enrichment.